Why “The Fit You” Matters in 2017

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So many women live their daily lives walking around feeling sad and depressed about the bodies they’re living in.  Let that statement sink for a little while.  Horrible isn’t it?

Whether they’re carrying around too much weight for whatever reason or feeling awkwardly thin, it breaks my heart that so many women seriously hate their own bodies.

I don’t think the solution is to just erase normal beauty standards and tell everyone they look incredible and think that’s going to solve the problem.  First off, there are usually deeper psychological issues as to why we gain weight (or become too thin) that need to be addressed, and encouraging someone toward denial is not being compassionate.  It’s actually prolonging their recovery into a healthy mentality about themselves and their bodies.

I named this blog “The Fit You,” because that’s exactly what I want women to think about.  I’m not necessarily talking about being “thin,” or even being at a certain “target weight,” for yourself, but rather the concept of being “fit.”

Imagine if you were able to get rid of the excess fat on your body that made you hate how you look in your own clothing?  Imagine how you’d feel so differently if you were physically stronger, had more muscle tone showing in your pictures on facebook, had more energy throughout the day, and were surprised how much better your face looked in pictures without the excess weight or water retention distorting your natural God-given looks?  Whether we want to admit it or not, these little things bother us more than we even know on a psychological level, which eventually… contributes to our overall happiness with our lives.

I’m speaking from my own experience here.  I’ve been very fit for probably 95% of my life, however, when I get off that track and have some significant pounds to lose, I become very aware when I don’t have the strength in my arms that I usually had.  Or the energy I had when I was regularly exercising.

I went back through our family pictures for the last year and a half, trying to mentally grasp how my body has really changed by adding 30 pounds and I was floored!  I realize some of you might think 3o pounds is nothing – but my body doesn’t hide fat well, and being overweight at all is not the norm for me.  I may be tall (which is an advantage when it comes to weight proportion, sorry short women! 😦 ), but my bones and frame are super tiny… this makes virtually any excess weight 10 lbs+ show up very quick, especially in photos.

My face changes so much when I’m overweight, and even if all these changes didn’t bother me much, the fact that none of my normal clothes fit psychologically affects me negatively.

Can women really learn to try to love the bodies they’re in right now?  I’m sure they can, but I think it’s more from them trying so long and failing so often at losing the weight, that they eventually give up hope of ever achieving their best fitness level and learn to accept defeat.  Then they go around angry at anyone who represents the fitness industry, accusing them of “fat shaming” simply by existing as a thin woman.  That’s not a good way to live your life.  We are all responsible for our choices, and it’s usually a choice to become fit or just accept yourself the way you are.  There are some women who insist they’re fit even though they have 100+ pounds of excess fat.

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Where do we draw the line for defining fitness?  When can we be honest and admit when we’ve lost sight of what we really were designed to look like?  And more importantly, why on earth do we feel like we need to lie to people when we know lying to them will never help them solve their problems?

I think all of us to some degree, have to combat the tendency to lie to ourselves and tell ourselves that it’s not that bad.  But when we finally see that Christmas photo a relative took of us when we were caught off guard, sometimes the truth hits us like a ton of bricks!  And we’re faced with the awful reality that bursts our bubble of denial that we thought we really didn’t look that bad.

But why do I want you to think about the fit you?  Because it’s great motivation and is almost always achievable baring medical conditions preventing you from losing weight or exercising.  Professional and Olympic atheletes often imagine them achieving their success many times before they even get to their event.  This imaginging themselves succeeding is actually benefical even for their muscles!  It’s not that different when imagining yourself achieving different kinds of successes or events that take physical and mental focus and training.  When you imagine yourself as being fit, exercising, or even building muscle, you’re actually preparing your brain and muscles in your body for achieving that success.

And your happiness level will go up!  The “fit you,” is proud of herself and what she looks like.  She can go out in a bathing suit and feel proud of her body, is stronger than you are now, has more energy with her kids and husband, and feels good naked in the light!

Simply put, the “fit you,” is more free.

Remembering my fit self gives me incredible motivation because I remember how good it felt – how wonderful it was to feel so much more energetic and not have to worry about which clothing minimized my “problem areas.”  You really are so much more free – free to have fun, free from worrying over how you may look, and free from feeling confined in a body you’re ashamed of at some level mentally.

Don’t you want that for yourself?  Aren’t you tired of feeling like you hate the body you’re in right now?  Are you tired of feeling like you looked better 5 or 10 years ago?  You don’t have to accept defeat or to learn to love your body if it’s truly at an unhealthy state.

You can make some changes!  We can do it!  And I’m doing it alongside you.

❤ ❤ ❤

Stephanie

 

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